Do you know what it takes to work towards a secure retirement? Use this calculator to help you create your retirement plan. View your retirement savings balance and your withdrawals for each year until the end of your retirement. Social security is calculated on a sliding scale based on your income. Including a non-working spouse in your plan increases your social security benefits up to, but not over, the maximum.

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Definitions

Current age
Your current age.

Age of retirement
Age you wish to retire. This calculator assumes that the year you retire, you do not make any contributions to your retirement savings. So if you retire at age 65, your last contribution happened when you were actually age 64. This calculator also assumes that you make your entire contribution at the end of each year.

Household income
Your total household income. If you are married, this should include your spouse's income.

Current retirement savings
Total amount that you currently have saved toward your retirement. Include all sources of retirement savings such as 401(k)s, IRAs and Annuities.

Rate of return before retirement
This is the annual rate of return you expect from your investments before taxes. The actual rate of return is largely dependent on the type of investments you select. From January 1970 to December 2004, the average compounded rate of return for the S&P 500, including reinvestment of dividends, was approximately 11.5% per year. During this period, the highest 12-month return was 64%, and the lowest was -39%. Savings accounts at a bank pay as little as 1% or less. It is important to remember that future rates of return can't be predicted with certainty and that investments that pay higher rates of return are subject to higher risk and volatility. The actual rate of return on investments can vary widely over time, especially for long-term investments. This includes the potential loss of principal on your investment.

Rate of return during retirement
This is the annual rate of return you expect from your investments during retirement. It is often lower than the return earned before retirement due to more conservative investment choices to help insure a steady flow of income. The actual rate of return is largely dependent on the type of investments you select. From January 1970 to December 2004, the average compounded rate of return for the S&P 500, including reinvestment of dividends, was approximately 11.5% per year. During this period, the highest 12-month return was 64%, and the lowest was -39%. Savings accounts at a bank pay as little as 1% or less. It is important to remember that future rates of return can't be predicted with certainty and that investments that pay higher rates of return are subject to higher risk and volatility. The actual rate of return on investments can vary widely over time, especially for long-term investments. This includes the potential loss of principal on your investment.

Percent of income to contribute
The percentage of your annual income you will save for your retirement goals.

Expected salary increase
Annual percent increase you expect in your household income.

Years of retirement income
Total number of years you expect to use your retirement income.

Percent of income at retirement
The percent of your working year's household income you think you will need to have in retirement. This amount is based on your income earned during the last year you will work. You can change this amount to be as low as 50% and as high as 150%.

Expected rate of inflation
What you expect for the average long-term inflation rate. A common measure of inflation in the U.S. is the Consumer Price Index (CPI), which has a long-term average of 3.1% annually, from 1925 through 2004.

If you are married checkbox
Check this box if you are married. Married couples have a higher maximum social security benefit than single wage earners.

To include Social Security checkbox
Check this box if you wish to include social security benefits in your retirement planning. Please note that the Social Security benefits could be different if your spouse worked and earned a benefit higher than one half of your benefit.



Information and interactive calculators are made available to you as self-help tools for your independent use and are not intended to provide investment advice. We can not and do not guarantee their applicability or accuracy in regards to your individual circumstances. All examples are hypothetical and are for illustrative purposes. We encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding all personal finance issues.


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*Not FDIC Insured *No Bank Guarantee
*Not a Bank Deposit
*Not Insured by any Federal Government Agency
*May Lose Value*

Securities, advisory services, and insurance products are offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor, member FINRA / SIPC. Sandy Spring Bank and Sandy Spring Investment Services are not registered broker/dealers and not affiliated with LPL Financial.
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This site is designed for U.S. Residents only. The services offered within this site are available exclusively through our U.S. Investment Representatives. LPL Financial's U.S. Investment Representatives may only conduct business with residents of the states for which they are properly registered. Please note that not all of the investments and services mentioned are available in every state.

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